When you've finished playing the scale forwards, play it in reverse. Embedded content: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3Rja43ELkys?rel=0. Start with the root note of A, then play C, D, E, G, and then a higher A. Be the first to know about new products, featured content, exclusive offers and giveaways. browse Fender Play's chord library, learn about chord types, and find tips on how to master them. You've been trying to play some "lead guitar", and are looking to learn more. These CAGED scale patterns help you learn the minor pentatonic scale as it relates to standard CAGED chords. Now, let’s play it in reverse (descending) order. In E minor (Em), the root note is E, the minor 3rd is G, and the perfect 5th is B. Here’s how to play Em. The pentatonic scale is one of the most commonly used scales used in music. A pentatonic scale consists of just five notes. And, then move up two frets again, and play that note. In the following lesson, you'll learn to play the major and minor pentatonic scale in five positions, all over the guitar fretboard. The pentatonic scale pattern appearing on this page begins here. The scale we played was an A minor pentatonic scale because the first note we played (sixth string, fifth fret) was the note A. If you're not a member yet, sign up for a free Fender Play trial! Sayce covers how blues legends like Stevie Ray Vaughn and Freddy King use fundamental skills to craft their iconic riffs and solos. Since the first and last notes of the pentatonic scale are the same note (an octave up), you can just begin repeating the pattern to play further up the string. I'm going to show you each position of this scale and break it up a little so it will be easier to visualize. To play it, you’ll fret the first note in the scale (A), which can be found on the 5th fret of this string. Now let’s play the G minor pentatonic scale … To play an A minor pentatonic scale in the third position, start at "A" on the fifth fret, then up three frets to the second note of the scale, then up two frets to the 10th fret, where we'll begin to play the above pattern. We're going to learn how to play the pentatonic scale in the "second position" — which means the first note in the position is the second note in the scale. In order to learn the minor pentatonic scale patterns all over the guitar fretboard, we must first learn the scale... 02. The numbered dots show where to place your fingers on the fretboard to play the scale. You're comfortable with some scale memorization. Those five notes are: These five notes can also be found among the seven notes making up the previously mentioned C major scale. Learning the major pentatonic scale is easy once you've learned the minor pentatonic scale - the two scales share all the same notes! Slide up three frets, and play that note. The two should sound like they fit. There are a variety of ways to play the A minor pentatonic scale. Move your index finger to the fourth fret to play the B note and use your middle finger to play the C note on the fifth fret. Once you're comfortable with the fingering, try sliding back and forth between the A minor and A major versions of the scale using this mp3 of a 12-bar blues in A as your background rhythm track. This last note should be the octave of the first note you played. So, to play the A major pentatonic scale, position your hands so that your fourth finger will play the note "A" on the sixth string (which means your first finger will be at the second fret of the sixth string). This means the formula for the minor pentatonic scale is made up of the 1st (root), 3rd (♭3), 4th (p4), 5th (p5), and 7th (♭7) from the minor scale. The note after that would be at the 22nd fret. Use the 5th position pattern to play these notes, then work your way back down the scale, starting with that higher A and climbing back down to G, E, G, C, and the low A. On the B string, you’ll play the 13th fret, followed by the 15th. Then, you’ll play two notes on each string, moving across the fretboard. So, for example, try creating a few guitar riffs using the G minor pentatonic scale in the third position (beginning on the 8th fret). The pattern changes on the D string, where you’ll play the 12th fret, followed by the 14th fret. Note: To use this pattern as a minor pentatonic scale, the root of the scale is played by your first finger on the fifth string. To play the notes on the third string, you’ll need to shift your fingers. For an added bonus, try to practice alternate picking when playing the scale. For this lesson, we’ll learn how to play using charts. It is a great scale to start with as an introduction to playing single notes on … Here is why it was important to learn the pentatonic scale on one string. Slide up three final frets, and play that note. Continue to play the scale, being sure to play all notes on the seventh fret with your third finger, and notes on the eighth fret with your fourth finger. To use this pattern as a major pentatonic scale, the root of the scale is played by your fourth finger on the fifth string. For the G major chord, the root note is G, the major 3rd is B, and the perfect 5th is D. Find out how to play it. Shapes. In order to play the fifth position of the minor pentatonic scale, count up to the fifth note of the scale on the sixth string. The Minor Pentatonic Scale is one that pretty much everyone should learn, regardless of the style you want to play because it's a real foundation for many language styles. You should spend time playing both the major and minor pentatonic scales. Find a few riffs you like in positions you're not used to playing in, and incorporate those into your guitar solos. You will hit all the same notes as in the previous example, but this time, the pattern will look a little different. And if you're ready to try Fender Play today, you can get 3 months of unlimited access free no credit card required. Experimentation and practice are the keys here. In order to play the fourth position of the minor pentatonic scale, count up to the fourth note of the scale on the sixth string. In this lesson, we’ll learn how to play it two different ways. Now, slide up two frets, and play that note. Once you get comfortable using the pentatonic scale patterns, you'll want to try and start incorporating them into your solos, to allow you to solo in one key all over the fretboard of the guitar. Start by picking a fret on the sixth string of your guitar - let's try the fifth fret (the note "A"). These diagrams represent the neck of your guitar. Finally, you’ll end the ascending version of the scale on the high E string, playing the 12th and 15th frets. If you started the scale pattern on the third fret of the sixth string, it would be the G minor pentatonic scale, since you started the pattern on the note G. If you started the scale on the third fret of the fifth string (the note "C"), you'd be playing the C minor pentatonic scale.

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